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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
's here to dish on the debt and deal in taxes. and big money, big problems? mitt romney's campaign is debt free, but where is all that money coming from? we'll tell you why it could add up to a little bit of trouble for the republican front-runner. good morning, it's monday, july 18th, 2011. i'm chuck todd. just 15 days until default day. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. it's a week of public spectacle and private wrangling. efforts to get a big debt deal done has failed. >> when you look in the past at agreements between divided government, it's taken leadership on both sides. it took reagan and o'neil. it took clinton and gingrich. the president is out there. he's willing to do it. he said it in the state of the union, he said it in the budget. the question is, do we have a partner to work with? and i hope the answer to that is yes. >> this week we'll see a two-track process. publicly, leaders will get a few votes out of the way to allow conservatives to get on the record on a balanced budget amendment and set the table that nothing besides the final deal can pass. meanw
. the big, brand new nbc "wall street journal" poll, and the revived gang of six which the white house is seizing on to give new life to the president's push for a big deficit reduction deal. the bipartisan group's proposal is still in outline form. they would reduce the deficit by 3.7 trillion over the next decade, cutting discretionary spending, defense spending, overhauling entitlement programs, rewriting the tax code by lowering rates, getting rid of deductions that overall would generate a trillion dollars in those deficit cuts. the plan got an enthusiastic reception from the white house and senate rank and file. watch. >> we now have a bipartisan group of senators who agree with that balanced approach. we have got the american people who agree with that balanced approach. >> 49 senators came to the room, and you know what, there were no fist fights, there were no -- there was no swearing. >> i think they're creating a vital center on what is the most important issue facing the country. >> it is a great start and it has provided great leadership. >>> but senate leaders mitch mccon
think speaker boehner has been very sincere about trying to do something big. i think he'd like to do something big. his politics within his caucus are very difficult. >> well, here's what he means. in a new poll, we see the complicated political caucus they are dealing with. the number of americans who are very concerned about default has ticked up seven points in the last two months. then it was just 35% believe not raising the limit and risking default was worse than raising it and potentially spurring more spending. now 42% see greater risk in a potential default, 47% are more concerned about lifting the limit but the gap has narrowed. that gets you talking about the education of the public in the last two months. look at the republican side. the folks who have been more engaged in this debate since the outset, the numbers have only hardened. 66% of republicans are more concerned with raising the debt limit compared to 60% in may. that number rises to 75% among republicans who identify with the tea party. so this is the issue. and speaker boehner has said he would only raise the d
a big quarter from team obama. fundraisers are predict they will bring in more than the record breaking that george bush raked in in 2003. the campaign tweeted add midnight, we're closing the books on the first chapter of the campaign with 493,697 donors. what does that mean? if he averages $200 a donor, he's going to be at awfully close to $100 million. obama did average $200 a donor the first two quarters as a candidate. campaign keeps pushing back on that. but do the math. in our look at all things independent. in battle ground states and emerging battleground states, the independent share of the voters equal to the two major parties or ahead, all courtesy of a book called how barack obama won, some guy here may have co-authored. in iowa and texas, 21%. in montana, 35%. 45% in new hampshire. bottom line is this, we know elections are won in the middle. wept strong for obama in '08. but the big question is there such a vacuum in the middle that somebody tries to fill it from the outside? we're going to talk about that later today. as bloomberg was first to reported, tim geithner has s
house back to the table, back to talking about something big. now, look, we still got a long ways to go. it's a weekend of sales jobs going on right now that actually began last night when the president had the congressional democratic leadership over to start talking turkey. so that brings us to the other sticking point, the actual substance. everybody has to figure out what to cut. this isn't going to be as easy as folks think and both sides are moving toward a deal that would include a trigger to assure mutually destructive politically when it comes to the two big items being kicked to committees or joint committees and that's still being figured out, tax and entitlements. one incentive plan would kill bush tax cuts for the rich and key portions of the new health care law if somehow the reforms for the tax code and social security and medicare weren't agreed to and implemented by january 1st, 2013. the question is, is the penalty on the bush tax cuts sort of the idea that you're kicking this down, is that going to be enough to assuage some democrats who believe there's too many cuts
chided leaders for missing a big opportunity. >> i think that any plan that simply says, you know, think about this later essentially, and we're going to try and figure out how things went wrong to blame it on the other party is a terrible mistake. we cannot go to august 2nd and tell the rest of the world because we're having this fight in our sandbox back here that we're going to essentially default on obligations of the united states for the first time in our history. that's a level of -- of immaturity that i don't believe this congress is up to. >> warren buffett was at the white house, and the white house talked to reporters this morning. david brooks calls out republican groups who he says decided not to seize the chance to usher in the largest cut in the size of government in american history. he also added, they do not see politics as the art of the possible. they do not believe in seizing opportunities to make steady, messy progress towards conservative goal. they believe if they can remain pure in their faith, some day their party will win a total and permanent victory over its
guns on something he's done his entire presidency, which is when there's a big bill that needs to get through congress, whether health care, whether the stimulus or whether this, he lets congress handle the details. he doesn't present his own legislation. he doesn't say here's my plan. let's amend from this. it's instead, trying to let's grab a piece here, let's grab a piece there. let congress do all the talking. we'll see. it is one of those debates that takes place among folks that observe this president from the outside wondering why does he keep doing it this way. who will win the battle long term? john boehner and harry reid teed up that fight yesterday. >> two groups of people from two different planets who barely understand the language of the other one. they're two remarkably different visions for what the appropriate role of the government should be in our society. how our country operates. it's stark and it would shock most americans. >> any time around here with the new tea party philosophy, they seem to think they have an all-knowing wisdom about the constitution. in shor
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)